I Am Number Four

i_am_number_four_poster-535x792 Director: D.J. Caruso
Writer: Alfred Gough/Miles Millar/Marti Noxon
Producers: Michael Bay/Steven Spielburg/Chris Bender/J.C. Spink/David Valdes
Starring: Alex Pettyfer/Timothy Olyphant/Dianna Agron
Year: 2011
Country: USA
BBFC Certification: PG
Duration: 114 minutes

Just like Harry Potter, Twilight and Percy Jackson, I Am Number Four is a best-selling teen novel about the supernatural and just like the three movies mentioned above, I Am Number Four may also be a movie series consisting of another six sequels. The trouble isn’t that it would spawn so many sequels but how the sequels could possibly work after a monotonous start to the franchise. John is an extraordinary teen, masking his true identity and passing as a typical high school student to elude a deadly enemy seeking to destroy him. Three like him have already been killed…he is Number Four. I Am Number Four’s story is simple. A little too simple. There’s nothing at all new about the story being told. It’s painfully predictable and it’s riddled with so many clichés that you know what’s going to happen five minutes before it happens on screen. The characters are a little more ridiculous and aren’t really likeable in the slightest. You couldn’t connect to any of them. Another problem with the movie is that the characters are very stereotypical. It’s the typical teenage love story with a sci-fi twist about a mysterious boy who keeps himself to himself but somehow there’s always a nice, cute girl who he risks everything for. Then you have the weird best friend, the I-can-kick-ass-too chick and the bully who becomes their friend with no explanation of how it happened. Nothing made any of them stand out at all. I Am Number Four had a great cast which included Timothy Olyphant, Alex Pettyfer and Dianna Agron. They performed as their characters quite well and were entertaining enough but it is a shame that their talents are wasted on such one-dimensional characters.

Although there’s worse teenage sci-fi movies out there, Alfred Gough and Miles Millar manage to hold a decent but predictable story accompanied with a heavily-cliché script. Unfortunately, the problem with the story is that it felt more like a television special more than it did a movie. D.J. Caruso directs I Am Number Four and does a good job but there were a few plot holes and a couple of character development issues. The audience aren’t able to properly connect with the characters and aren’t given any reasons why some characters behave the way they do. Overall, I Am Number Four has some cool action scenes and a mediocre story but there’s so much better out there. Some parts are pretty mundane but when the action scenes kick in, there are some pretty impressive parts. Unfortunately, it just fails to wow its audience. No doubt that younger teenage audiences will be impressed but for those who are older, they might be a little bored.

This definitely could have been a lot better than it was. I Am Number Four starts off great but then slowly declines from there. We follow stereotypical characters doing mostly predictable things, which wouldn’t have been too bad, if the story was actually good. Unfortunately, the story fails to be memorable in the slightest. There have been rumours that there are another six sequels in the line. All I have to say is that the directors and the writers have to focus and do a lot of adjustments to make the next movie at least memorable before even considering thinking about more sequels. I think everybody reading this review can probably guess what I’m going to give this movie…

4/10

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